Parents in Florida who are going through a divorce may find that one of the toughest parts of splitting up is not being able to see their kids every day. They may also find it challenging to agree on a child custody schedule. Even if parents do manage to agree on this, they still need to work out the logistics of who will have the children and when.

The best schedules for young children: 2-2-3 or 3-4-4-3

Though some parents may find it easier to trade off custody once a week, this can be more harmful in the long run. Not only will it be difficult for parents to go one full week without seeing their kids, it can cause separation anxiety for the kids as well, particularly younger ones. A better alternative is the 2-2-3 schedule or the 3-4-4-3 schedule, which makes it so that neither parent goes more than four days without seeing their children.

Is it ok to see my children less than 50% of the time?

Though it is a good idea for parents to share equal physical custody, this does not mean that a less-than-even split will not work, particularly if the children are older. If your work schedule, location, or finances prevent you from being able to adequately parent your kids half of the time, you can consider a 5-2 schedule or an every extended weekend schedule, which would give you three nights per week with your kids.

How an attorney can help you negotiate a custody schedule that works for you

Of course, these are not the only things you should consider when setting a child custody schedule. Even if you and your ex-partner can agree on a regular schedule, you should also plan for things like summer break and holidays, which should include a discussion of when and whether each of you will be allowed to travel with your children on an extended vacation. If you need assistance developing a child custody plan, you should consider consulting a family law attorney.